Where to witness the partial eclipse over Florida

The partial eclipse begins at 1:36 p.m. ET on Monday. Remember you can’t look directly into the sun, because it can cause permanent eye damage. (Image via Shutterstock).

By Mivette Vega

April 2, 2024

Floridians will be able to see the moon blocking 54 to 82% of the sun. Those in the northwest corner of the state will see more of the eclipse.

Although Florida is not in the path of totality, a partial eclipse will be visible in Central Florida on April 8. 

According to the National Weather Service (NWS), the best chances for clear viewing of the total eclipse are in northern New England and upstate New York.

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Texas, Oklahoma, Arkansas, Missouri, Illinois, Kentucky, Indiana, Ohio, Pennsylvania, Vermont, New Hampshire, and Maine are all in the path of totality also, but the NWS warned clouds may impede the view from these locations.

Florida is in the path of a partial eclipse, but the view will depend on how clear the sky will be that day.

According to AccuWeather, Florida will be dry on Monday thanks to a system of high pressure off the Carolinas, and there’s a low chance for clouds across the Panhandle and Big Bend areas. 

Meanwhile, forecasts for the East Coast and South Florida show some cloud cover in those areas. 

“The more northwest you go looks to be the best chance for less restrictions view of the eclipse,” Tyler Roys, AccuWeather senior meteorologist told The Florida Times-Union.

Floridians will be able to see the moon blocking 54 to 82% of the sun. Residents in the northwest corner of the state will see more of the eclipse.

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The partial eclipse begins at 1:36 p.m. ET. Remember you can’t look directly into the sun, because it can cause permanent eye damage. 

You’ll need to wear solar eclipse glasses. The prescription glasses retailer Warby Parker is offering free eclipse glasses. Also, some libraries have the glasses available, but you should call first to check availability.

Author

  • Mivette Vega

    Mivette Vega is a seasoned journalist and multimedia reporter whose stories center the Latino community. She is passionate about justice, equality, environmental matters, and animals. She is a Salvadorrican—Salvadorian that grew up in Puerto Rico—that has lived in San Juan, Venice, Italy, and Miami.

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