What are the most common sharks in Florida?

What are the most common sharks in Florida?

The bonnethead shark is one of the most common species in Florida. Image via Canva.

By Crystal Harlan

July 3, 2024

Not all sharks are the same! Some are more aggressive than others, and they come in all sizes and shapes.

Familiarize yourself with the sharks that inhabit our waters year round. Here are seven of the most common shark species in Florida.

What are the most common sharks in Florida?Blacktip shark: This is a fast-swimming shark, common in Florida waters, that can reach 6 feet in length. It is one of the more aggressive species and has been implicated in numerous attacks on humans

 

 

 

What are the most common sharks in Florida?Bonnethead shark. As the name suggests, this shark’s head is similar to a hammerhead’s but more rounded, like a spade or bonnet. It reaches 3.5 feet maximum and is harmless to humans.

 

 

 

What are the most common sharks in Florida?Lemon shark: These sharks hang out close to the shore and sometimes enter estuaries and rivers. They can reach 10.5 feet and rarely attack people.

 

 

 

What are the most common sharks in Florida?Great hammerhead shark. Reaching up to 18 feet in length, this shark, easily identified by its hammer-shaped head, is considered dangerous.

 

 

 

What are the most common sharks in Florida?Bull shark: This is a common apex predator that can grow to 6.5 feet in length. It is one of the few shark species that may inhabit freshwater, and venture hundreds of miles inland via coastal river systems. The bull shark is dangerous, accounting for the third highest number of attacks on humans.

 

 

What are the most common sharks in Florida?Tiger shark This shark can grow to up to 18 feet and is common in a variety of habitats including river mouths, shallow bays, and open ocean. Tiger sharks are second only to the Great White shark in the number of attacks on humans worldwide.

 

 

What are the most common sharks in Florida?Nurse shark: This shark is often seen lying motionless on the bottom of the ocean floor, near coral reefs, rocks, and mangrove islands. It can reach up to 9 feet and has been involved in very few attacks on humans, most of which were provoked.

 

 

RELATED: Florida is the shark bite capital of the world, according to new report

Author

  • Crystal Harlan

    Crystal is a bilingual editor and writer with over 20 years of experience in digital and print media. She is currently based in Florida, but has lived in small towns in the Midwest, Caracas, New York City, and Madrid, where she earned her MA in Spanish literature.

CATEGORIES: ANIMALS
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