Rep. Nydia Velázquez proposes new legislation to enhance training for textured hair care

Rep. Nydia Velázquez proposes new legislation to enhance training for textured hair care

The Texture Positive Act of 2024 will establish a federal grant program enabling states to provide grants to minority or women-owned businesses and nonprofits with expertise in textured-hair education. Peathegee Inc. via Getty Images.

By Mivette Vega

July 2, 2024

The Puerto Rican congresswoman explained in a statement that the textured hair industry in the US is worth around $2.5 billion dollars, yet cosmetology schools are not required to train their students to care for it. 

Rep. Nydia M. Velázquez (D-NY) introduced the Texture Positive Act of 2024  on June 28 to incentivize educational training in cosmetology schools across the country and increase the number of trained professionals with the skills and knowledge to work with textured hair. 

The term “textured hair” refers to hair that is coiled, curly, or wavy in its natural state.

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 Rep Velázquez explained in a statement that the textured hair industry in the US is worth around $2.5 billion dollars, yet cosmetology schools are not required to train their students to care for it. 

The Texture Positive Act of 2024 will establish a federal grant program enabling states to provide grants to minority or women-owned businesses and nonprofits with expertise in textured-hair education. These organizations will collaborate with cosmetology schools to develop and implement more inclusive education and training programs.

“Far too many people with textured hair feel marginalized when they enter a salon or work in the beauty, fashion, and entertainment industries because few cosmetic professionals are properly trained on how to care for textured hair,” said Congresswoman Velázquez in the statement. “This lack of trained professionals not only hurts communities of color that tend to have textured hair, but it also does a disservice to professionals’ post-cosmetology school careers when they enter the workforce and lack the techniques to service diverse clientele. I am proud to introduce the Texture Positive Act of 2024, which will help foster new partnerships between experienced small and minority women-owned businesses and cosmetology schools to produce more trained professionals in textured hair.”

In 2020, TRESemmé’s Hair Bias Report revealed that 86% of Black women surveyed encountered difficulties obtaining consistent, high-quality service at salons. These issues included finding a stylist knowledgeable about their hair texture and experiencing overt bias and discrimination during their appointments. The study also highlighted that 65% of hairstylists desired additional training for working with textured hair, with this figure rising to 70% among white stylists.

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The Texture Positive Act of 2024, co-sponsored by a group of Democrats, was endorsed by SAG-AFTRA, Youma’s Beauty, Professional Beauty Association (PBA), The Personal Care Products Council, and Color of Change.

“The Professional Beauty Association (PBA) is grateful to Congresswoman Velazquez and her staff for the introduction of the Texture Positive Act of 2024. This legislation recognizes and validates the need for texture hair care education and training. Our members throughout the country appreciate the attention to this long-standing challenge and embracing the beauty, health, and safety for all individuals with textured hair. The Texture Positive Act of 2024 aligns with PBA and the Texture Education Collective’s work to bridge the texture hair care education gap for students, and licensed beauty professionals. Thank you for highlighting education, training, and access to services equally for all individuals with textured hair,” said Myra Reddy, Director of Government Affairs for Professional Beauty Association (PBA).

Author

  • Mivette Vega

    Mivette Vega is a seasoned journalist and multimedia reporter whose stories center the Latino community. She is passionate about justice, equality, environmental matters, and animals. She is a Salvadorrican—Salvadorian that grew up in Puerto Rico—that has lived in San Juan, Venice, Italy, and Miami.

CATEGORIES: NATIONAL POLITICS
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