Navigating voter registration in Florida: What you need to know

According to data from 2022, Florida is the second state where there are the most Latinos eligible to vote, after California. (Image via Shutterstock).

By Mivette Vega

April 17, 2024

An estimated 36.2 million Latinos are eligible to vote this year. That’s up from the 32.3 million that voted in 2020. This represents 50% of the total growth in eligible voters during this time.

A recent Pew Research Center analysis revealed Latinos have grown “at the second-fastest rate of any major racial and ethnic group in the US electorate since the last presidential election.”

RELATED: State Rep. Gallop Franklin urges voters to get involved

But that promising outlook may be clouded by the law that Gov. Ron DeSantis signed last year, which prohibits third-party organizations from registering new voters and imposes $50,000 fines if they make any errors.

According to data from 2022, Florida is the second state where there are the most Latinos eligible to vote, after California.

During his testimony, Florida director for the Unidos US organization Jared Nordlund said that the law will impede Latino votes. He pointed out that many of his constituents lack familiarity with web-based services and suffer from a language barrier when communicating with officials.

To help make things easier, we have created a guide to help you with the most important steps to register.

Requirements to vote:

  • At least 18 years of age (you can pre-register on or after your 16th birthday).
  • A US citizen
  • A legal resident of Florida and of the county where you intend to vote


You cannot register to vote if you are:

  • Adjudicated mentally incapacitated with respect to voting, unless that right has been restored.
  • A convicted felon, unless your right to vote has been restored (through clemency or by completion of all terms of the sentence, as is applicable.)
  • Not a US citizen

How to register or update your voter registration:

  • The most convenient way is through Florida’s online voter registration system, RegisterToVoteFlorida.gov. It is available in English and Spanish, 24/7. You can enter your information on a form and you can submit it electronically. If you prefer you can print, sign, date, and submit it to your county Supervisor of Elections.
  • You can also submit your voter application registration online through the Department of Highway Safety and Motor Vehicles’(DHSMV) GoRenew.com at the same time as you update information on your driver license or state identification card.
  • Another way is to hand-deliver or mail paper applications to any County Supervisor of Elections’ office.
  • Other in-person options are places that issue Florida driver licenses or Florida identification cards.
  • Voter registration forms are also available in public libraries and public assistance offices.

Reasons to update your registration:

  • If your address changes, it is best to update your record as soon as possible to minimize any issues before you vote.
  • You change your name by marriage or other legal process. In that case, you need to include your former name (if you are registered under your previous name and your new Florida driver license or identification card number changes so that the information on record corresponds to your new name). Name changes are allowed at the polls too.
  • Signatures change over time too, so if your current signature doesn’t match the one you have on record the ballot may not count. Update your signature regularly so that whenever signature verification occurs, your signature will be up-to-date. You must use a paper voter registration application to submit a signature update.
  • To choose or change your party affiliation, submit an updated voter registration application online or by paper. You cannot change your party at the polling place. To be effective for a primary election, a party selection or change must be made at least 29 days before the election.

When to register to vote:

  • You can apply to register or update your voter registration record at any time. However, to vote in an upcoming election, the registration deadline is the 29th day before the election. A later registration deadline is available under limited circumstances for military and overseas citizens. For more information, you can contact your county Supervisor of Elections office.

If you’re voting for the first time in Florida:

If you are registering by mail for the first time and you have never been issued a Florida driver license number, Florida identification card number, or a Social Security number, you will have to swear that you have never been issued one under oath on your application. You will need to provide a copy of one of the following identifications either with the application before you vote for the first time:

  • United States passport
  • Debit or credit card
  • Military identification
  • Student identification
  • Retirement center identification
  • Neighborhood association identification
  • Public assistance identification
  • Veteran health identification card issued by the US Department of Veteran Affairs
  • Florida license to carry a concealed weapon or firearm. Employee identification card issued by any branch, department, agency, or entity of the Federal Government, the state, a county, or a municipality.
  • Suppose you have not been issued one of the identifications above. In that case, you must provide a copy of these documents: utility bill; bank statement; government check or paycheck; other government document containing your name and current residence address. Please contact your Supervisor of Elections for further information.

RELATED: What you need to know to vote in Florida’s 2024 elections

Author

  • Mivette Vega

    Mivette Vega is a seasoned journalist and multimedia reporter whose stories center the Latino community. She is passionate about justice, equality, environmental matters, and animals. She is a Salvadorrican—Salvadorian that grew up in Puerto Rico—that has lived in San Juan, Venice, Italy, and Miami.

CATEGORIES: VOTING

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